Artist Erika Lizée creates large-scale installation in Pierce College Solo Show

Erika Lizée
Gazing into the Great Unknown

August 27 – September 27, 2018
Reception: Thursday, September 13th, 6 – 8 pm

Pierce College Art Gallery
6201 Winnetka Ave.
Woodland Hills, CA 91371

https://www.erikalizee.com/

(Woodland Hills, California) – Please join us Thursday September 13th 6-8pm at the Pierce College Art Gallery for the reception of Erika Lizée’s Solo Exhibition. Lizée is a painter who creates illusion-based installations. Mysterious, biomorphic forms appear to exist within the walls of the gallery, while tendril-like elements expand and emerge into the physical space of the viewer. She imagines gallery walls as symbolic thresholds between different realms of existence, between life and death. The illusionistic quality of these installations also speaks to how perceptions and beliefs create reality.

The use of illusion in her work is important, as it gives rise to simultaneous feelings of wonder and uncertainty in viewers. For Lizée, it serves as a metaphor for how we can feel such awe for the beauty, complexity and interconnectedness of the world we live in, while also harboring intense feelings of doubt and anxiety surrounding the big questions of where we come from, what the purpose of our lives is and what happens when we eventually die.

Lizée has always been drawn to Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, which is a tale that considers how our perceptions of the world around us create what we believe to be real. When our perceptions change through experience, so do our concepts of what is real. In her installations, the use of illusionistic and sculptural paintings work in conjunction with actual light and shadow to create a transformative experience for viewers, as their perceptions shift with a greater understanding of the relationship between artistic materials and exhibition space.

The installations serve as a parallel for the journey of our personal and shared life experiences. Individually, each piece has its own inspirations, pulling from sacred geometry, nature and symbols of the feminine. Overall, these works speak to the deep-rooted questions we have always faced in relation to the existence of the universe and our role in it.

Erika Lizée was born in Chicago, Illinois, yet was raised in a tiny town in Northern Wisconsin. Much of her childhood was spent exploring the woods, swimming the lakes and climbing the snowdrifts of this serene part of the country. Her upbringing fostered a strong connection to the natural world, which remains an important aspect of Lizée’s life and artwork.

Ms. Lizée is an artist that creates site-specific, illusion-based installations with acrylic paint. Most recently, she has built installations within the Vita Art Center, Gallery 825, Launch LA, ArtShare LA, and the International Terminal at the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). Her work has been featured in Juxtapoz, Beautiful/Decay, HiFructose, The Huffington Post and Beautiful Bizarre magazines.

Erika Lizée earned a BFA in Painting from UNC Asheville, and her MFA in Painting from CSU Northridge. She is a Professor of Art at Moorpark College, as well as the Director of the Moorpark College Art Gallery. She lives and works in the greater Los Angeles area.

“ECHO ENIGMA” – SCOTT FROSCHAUER’S NEW SOLO EXHIBITION CONFRONTS DIVISIVENESS IN AMERICA

AN ARTIST TALK SUNDAY, MAY 20TH, 3-5 P.M.
ALTADENA OPEN STUDIOS TOUR, JUNE 3RD 11-5 P.M.
CLOSING RECEPTION ON JUNE 10TH, 2-5 P.M.

Ark Gallery and Studios is pleased to present a solo exhibit with Los Angeles multimedia artist Scott Froschauer. The artist explores themes of social connectivity, community and complexity. Froschauer gained notoriety with his “The Word on The Street” series of subversively positive street signs.

In Froschauer’s latest exhibit at ARK, the artist reflects on America’s increasingly polarized climate, etching distressed mirrors with portraits of various historical American figures. The artist injects elements that complicate otherwise one-dimensional narratives. He states that, “Deciding how to categorize them becomes more of a statement about the viewer, who is reflected in the distressed surface of each piece.” Hero and villain become blurred in the complex reality of the subjects humanity.

That complexity becomes the underlying fabric of the shows centerpiece. The exhibit’s focal point is a model for a large-scale artwork entitled United Divider that proposes a size of 15 feet tall by 20 feet long. Reminiscent of Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc that infamously overtook Federal Plaza in New York in the 1980’s, the 120-foot-long curved steel panel divided an otherwise open public space and was eventually taken down due to public outcry. Froschauer proposes a monument of polished stainless steel, waving, and etched with the likeness of the American flag. When viewed up close, the flag’s stars and stripes consist of lines of text bearing the names of historical Americans, human beings who we might find ourselves simplifying into heroes or villains, but which are actually more complex. Again, the polished surface reminds the viewer that their impression of these individuals is more of a reflection of their own preconceptions. Froschauer comments, “The epic scale of this piece gives it a stance as a wall, separating those who might stand on either side of it. The reflective quality of the piece denotes that this idea of America is a reflection of all who observe it. The symbol of the flag brings us all together and tears us all apart. It is the United Divider.”

Several related events will follow the April 29th opening from 3-6 p.m. including a May 20th artist talk from 3-5 p.m., an Altadena Open Studios Tour day on 3rd from 11-5 p.m., and a closing reception on June 10th from 2-5 p.m.

Ark Gallery and Studios is located at 2599 Fair Oaks Ave., Altadena, CA 91001

 

 

SEARCHING
Kathryn Hart

May 2-30, 2018
School of Visual Arts Project Spaces CE
NY, NY

The School of Visual Arts (SVA) presents Searching, a solo show by artist Kathryn Hart. The exhibition will be on view from May 2-30, 2018 in the Project Spaces CE locations at 209 East 23rd Street, Main floor, and 380 2nd Ave, 8th floor. This is Hart’s first solo show at the SVA.

In this solo exhibition, Hart explores the web of emotions confronted in the search to begin anew, and the burden of choice. She continues her dialogue with evolving identity and the hope for new beginnings amidst a maze of emotional conflict, pain, and self-doubt.

Hart offers, “after life leaves us tumbled upside down, completely derailed, we pick ourselves up and begin the search for…personal truth, enlightenment, growth, love, connections, a place to feel comfortable, a place to call home. We even search for the place to start the search. My flightpath was obliterated by an onslaught of happenings – my husband’s cancer, the deaths of both my parents, and my own struggle with an ongoing disease and trauma. How do I move forward?

The search starts with one intent, one thought, one moment, one breath, one catalyst, one cell, one dot. A series of dots, actions, sparks, ideas, or energy becomes a line, a trajectory. Lines reveal potential paths ahead and scars of the ones just followed.”

Kathryn Hart presents this theme across an array of media, which further illustrates the plethora of options for the journey. An on-site installation of hundreds of lines, wires and embedded glass lenses explores the miasma of available routes, some more circuitous and arduous, some involving forced self-reflection. Hart uses these laboriously hand tied knots and line to translate a period of unsettling uncertainty into a path to move forward. Shadowy lines hover behind the actual as beacons or footprints. Ink drawings, reminiscent of ancient cave drawings, indicate the inception of thought and movement. Abstract black and white photographs of found bones allude to structure, life, and an archeological excavation for hidden meanings. There is simplicity and strength in their starkness. The exhibition also includes complex hanging sculptures with line and objects embedded into dense surfaces. In all the presented artworks, Hart examines the dichotomies of movement and stillness, contemplation and decision, and space and line, and the importance of the duality in the search.

“Line represents journey, connections, strength, simplicity, scars, tethers, and choice. Knots can be entanglements, junctures, bindings, obstacles, hurdles, gates and coupling.  I learned suture knots from my plastic surgeon father. His knots would both join and conceal.”

Hart delves into the tension between the search and choice, and ultimately, personal accountability. “We are bound by the choices we make. In the end, my search and its discoveries are all up to me.”

“I am inspired by many artists, particularly the poetry and bravery of Eva Hesse, the bold structures of Lee Bontecou, and the power and personal revelations of Louise Bourgeois.”

Kathryn Hart is a multi-disciplinary artist who exhibits frequently in New York City, throughout Europe, and most recently, Los Angeles. Museum, solo and group shows include Ateneo de Madrid (Madrid, Spain), Howland Cultural Center (Beacon, NY), IDEA Space/Colorado College, Andre Zarre Gallery (NYC), the Chelsea Art Museum (NYC), ArtHaus (Denver), Galerie SD Szucha 8 (Warsaw), Galeria 33 (Poland), Zamek w Goluchowie, (Poland), Myslenice Cultural Center (Poland), the Oceanside Museum of Art (CA), Museo de Castello de Estense (Italy), The Mitchell Museum (MD), Southern Nevada Museum of Fine Arts (Las Vegas), and the Colorado History Museum.

Her artwork is in the public collections of the Ministry of Culture of France, the Ministry of Culture of Poland, the Southern Nevada Museum of Fine Arts, the Myslenice Cultural Center (Poland), and many private collections worldwide.

International awards include scholarships from the Council of Europe (2016), and the Ministries of Art and Culture of France and Poland (2015, 2014), and the United Nations Harmony for Peace Award (2010).

Hart is a member of A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn, NY. She holds a B.A. from Boston University, an MBA from the University of Texas at Arlington, and has extended studies in art from the School of Visual Arts in NYC and the City of London Polytechnic. Hart lives in Colorado.

For more information, contact Nika Lopez at ceartwork@sva.edu 212-592-2050. http://www.sva.edu/ce

Hours are Monday-Saturday, 9am-9pm. The artist is available for private discussion and tours from May 20-May 29. Contact Kathryn Hart directly at 214-363-4025 or hart.kathrynd@gmail.com. Visit http://www.KathrynDHart.com for more information.

 

Diane Williams | INcongruence
A solo show exhibition at Gallery 825

825 North La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90069

March 17 – April 20, 2018

Opening reception: March 17, 6pm-9pm

Gallery 825 in Los Angeles, California is pleased to present INcongruence, a solo show exhibition by Diane Williams.

Diane Williams is a Los Angeles based artist whose work includes several disciplines to approach the subject of xenophobia and gender bias. In her work, Williams seeks to find a common ground between the art she makes and the community at large. The project aims to reflect the immigrant communities as well as the whole nation, illustrating the idea of an extended community while challenging assumptions and norms.

INcongruence involves a participatory art piece and an installation that will confront viewers, turning them into active participants. The installation consists of 8 large modules made out of wire, recycled and manipulated fiber such as: yarn, thread, fabric, and shredded paintings, interwoven together and creating an immersive structure that fills Gallery 825’s largest front space. These materials have personal history, discarded or purchased from the artist’s neighborhood Thrift Shop in Glassell Park and the Fabric District in Downtown Los Angeles called Santee Alley, frequented by many lower and middle income immigrant families. Williams intertwined these elements into modular weavings, reminiscent of protest signs and roadside memorials that will operate as obstructions, confinement and disruptions. The polychromatic modules are an amalgamation of diverse textures and components. A reminder that America is clearly divided as a nation but we have more in common than we are often led to believe. Diversity is what makes this country great.

About Diane Williams
Diane Williams is a multidisciplinary artist living and working in Los Angeles, CA. She earned her BFA degree from California State University, Long Beach in 2013. Her work has been featured in select publications and exhibited in solo shows including Beautiful Creatures at Cerritos College Gallery (2018) and several group exhibitions: With Liberty and Justice for Some at Walter Maciel, Culver City, Personal Narrative at the Annenberg Beach House Gallery, Santa Monica (2017), WE: Visual Reflections of the American Experiment, Azusa Pacific University, Azusa. Williams has works in both private and public collections: National Immigration Law Center, Los Angeles and Washington DC headquarters (2016) and Azusa Pacific University (2017). She’s currently working on a solo show in March of 2018 at Gallery 825 in Los Angeles and a residency at Museum of Art and History – MOAH, Lancaster, CA scheduled for late 2019.
http://www.dianewilliamsartist.com

About Gallery 825
Gallery 825 is the exhibition arm of the Los Angeles Art Association. Purchased in 1958, the gallery, which is located in the heart of Los Angeles at 825 North La Cienega Boulevard, provides LAAA artists with a professional venue in which to show their work.

Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 10-5pm

 

Randi Matushevitz

Conundrum Solo Exhibit

March 17th-April 20th, 2018 Opening reception: Saturday, March 17th, 6-9 p.m.

LAAA | Gallery 825 825 N. La Cienaga Blvd., CA 90069 Ph. 310.652.8272

Randi Matushevitz’s unmasked expressionism

(Los Angeles, California) – Gallery 825 is pleased to present a solo exhibit with L.A.-based artist Randi Matushevitz whose works on canvas deliver an unmasked view of humanity within our current socio-political climate. Matushevitz’s themes of social inequities seen from the point of view of the homeless and technologically-mobile paint a stark portrait of humanity.

Matushevitz further draws upon contrasts materially, through dense networks of markmaking, stenciling, spray-painting, and traditional painting in oil and acrylic. The works’ charged positive and negative spaces illuminate her subjects conflating tender vulnerability with violence and dislocation.

Matushevitz draws upon and resonates with the aesthetics of German Expressionism whose adopters reacted to the rise of academic art, nationalism, and militarism leading up to, and during World War I. Expressionism’s narratives advanced humanistic ideas of social displacement, alienation, urbanization and eschewed formal conventions of Impressionism and academic art. In her 2017 essay Expressive Intensity, writer Betty Ann Brown articulated in Matushevitz’s art, an essential expression of the “…the human condition, our quest for connectivity, and the pain we all suffer in this earthly existence.”

The public is invited to attend Matushevitz’s opening reception on Sunday, March 17th, 6-9 p.m. where the artist will be on hand to discuss her techniques and questions.

Cynthia Minet
Migrations

International Museum of Art and Science (IMAS)
1900 W Nolana Ave McAllen, Texas 78504
http://theimasonline.org
http://cynthiaminet.com/

April 14th to September 2nd, 2018
Public reception April 14th 3-5pm

Open Studio at the Brewery
660 South Avenue 21 #10 LA Ca 90031
Sunday March 4th 2-5pm

Facebook event

 

(McAllen, Texas) – Los Angeles artist Cynthia Minet is pleased to present Migrations, a one-person exhibition at The International Museum of Art and Science (IMAS) in McAllen, Texas, from April 14th to September 2nd, 2018.

Migrations takes borderland regions of the Rio Grande Valley as its point of departure and specifically uses the Roseate Spoonbill, a large bird native to the Southeast coastal region as an artistic surrogate for human experiences. Minet is well known for the creation of large-scale sculptures of animals constructed from repurposed plastics—detergent bottles, water containers, found toys, etc. that are then illuminated from within by glowing LED lights. She creates magnificent aesthetic objects that metaphorically call attention to our dependency on electricity and petrochemicals. Her conceptually and politically astute artworks draw the audience in, and then prompt them to thoughtfully consider and question contemporary society and lifestyle.

In Migrations, Minet will exhibit five suspended sculptures and one floor piece in addition to select wall-mounted drawings. Like most of her installations, this work is site-responsive, and uses recycled plastic debris from Los Angeles in addition to found materials gathered from the borderlands region of the Rio Grande Valley. The center piece of the installation is a graceful representation of the Roseate Spoonbill in various stages of flight. These sculptural birds are accompanied by light sequencing and motion activated sound that consists of wing beats, running water, bird calls and footsteps through grass that create a sense of mystery and movement in the darkened space. In addition, embedded into these sculptures are artifacts dropped by migrants who have crossed the border fence or the Rio Grande River into Texas. Minet’s visually accessible, meaningful and richly layered works call attention to the fact that plastic will erode but never disappear, that habitats and species will be lost to climate change and pollution and never return, and that people will risk everything to escape intolerable situations only to be denied entry into a new land.

Cynthia Minet’s artworks have been exhibited both in the USA and internationally. Her recent solo exhibitions include: Avian, Vita Art Center at the Bell Arts Factory, Ventura (2016); Beast of Burden, USC Fisher Museum of Art, University of Southern California (2015); Packing Caravan, the Los Angeles International Airport, (2013), Unsustainable Creatures, UC Riverside’s Culver Center for the Arts (2012), as well as installations at the Anchorage Museum, AK (2014), the Huntington Beach Art Center, the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History, and at GATE Projects, Glendale. International group exhibitions include museum and gallery shows since 2000. Minet is professor of studio art at Moorpark College, Moorpark, CA.

Monica Wyatt
Continuum

Solo exhibition

Opening reception: January 20, 2018 6-8pm
On view: January 20 to March 3, 2018

MOAH: Cedar
44857 Cedar Ave
Lancaster, CA 93534

lancastermoah.org
monicawyatt.com

(Lancaster, California) – The Museum of Art and History in Lancaster, California, is pleased to present Continuum, a solo exhibition by Los Angeles based artist Monica Wyatt.

The curator of the exhibition, jill moniz, writes in an essay, “Monica Wyatt is an artistic alchemist, collecting materials and turning them into precious objects. In this process, Wyatt fuses the history of the materials together to create new beginnings, representing the cyclic nature of all things. This exhibition is a metanarrative of this practice, where Wyatt continues to reimagine objects and compositions that speak forcefully about her inspirations, interventions and intentions.

Wyatt is passionate in her hunt for materials, honoring the histories of these elements whilst stripping them bare so that her reworking feels organic and never forced. She dissembles organs, pianos, cables, sieves and other utilitarian items from a past when people valued human production and craftsmanship. Her objects honor that past and create a new language on an aesthetic continuum that conveys the resonance of an alchemy that we all possess, and reminds the viewer that identity and community are made from diverse elements brought together in harmony.

In another layer of synergy, Wyatt is interested in transforming inorganic materials into shapes that signify nature. Her assemblage is filled with both organic and manmade materials and she challenges the viewer to consider the aesthetic qualities of each as they contribute to her compositions. She makes electric capacitors look like plant life and zip ties mimic deep sea life in order to further a dialog about preservation of all the things we should hold dear.”

MOAH Cedar presents Continuum, Wyatt’s first installation at the museum and the ongoing collaboration with curator jill moniz. Wyatt’s assemblage has evolved from the early influence of Joseph Cornell to a more outside of the box approach. She credits Betye Saar, Claire Falkenstein, Ruth Asawa, Louise Bourgeois, Eva Hesse and Lee Bontecou with giving her the courage and impetus to pursue engaging themes and compositions that reflect her love for materials, and the new life and meaning she gives them.