JJ LHeureux
Nude Male Maids
Venice, California

Feminism Now

Visual Art Exhibition by the Feminist Image Group, Shoebox Projects and Krogen Amerika

Shoebox Projects, Los Angeles
1660 South Avenue 21 #3
Los Angeles, California, CA 90031
http://www.shoeboxprojects.com
https://www.facebook.com/shoeboxprojects/

 

The exhibition will run Feb 24 – March 11, 2018
Opening Reception: opening Sunday Feb 25, 3-6pm
Gallery hours by appointment
All events free and open to the public.

http://fig-art.blogspot.com/

Members of the San Diego Feminist Image Group, Shoebox Projects and the Swedish Group Krogen Amerika present artworks that explore multiple visions of what feminism is today, in the context of Southern California and Northern Europe. Artists address the complexity of gender equality through themes such as sexism, body image, class, race, politics, spirituality, domesticity, biology, and history.

This exhibition will travel to Stockholm, Sweden in May 2018.

The public is invited to attend the opening reception on Sunday, February 25, from 3-6pm at Shoebox Projects in the Brewery Arts Complex, Los Angeles. Artists will be present to engage the public.

The Feminist Image Group was formed in 2009. FIG is a coalition of San Diego visual artists who meet to discuss art, see exhibitions, and support one another in our careers. We work across many media, including drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, installation, digital media and performance. The group has had exhibitions at San Diego Mesa College, Art Produce Gallery, Hyde Gallery at Grossmont College, Art San Diego Artfair, and has an upcoming exhibition at the Women’s Museum of California.
“Krogen Amerika” is the name of a Swedish printmaking group in the region of Östergötland in Sweden. The group works out of a a red wooden house from 1704 in the very center of the Swedish city of Linköping. During the years, it has functioned as a private home, a local pub, and a meeting place for emigrants to America (hence the name of the house, “Krogen Amerika”). Now it is a fully functional printmaking studio and art gallery. This artist-run gallery and studio space is partly funded by the city of Linköping. About 20 artists work here, and also together manage the space, with the support from the local community. The gallery exhibits artists from all over Sweden. Krogen America has exhibited as a group at Norrköpings Museum, Östergötlands Museum, Grafiska Sällskapet, the Palo Alto City Hall, Odense Konsthall Danmark, Berlin Kunstfactor.

Participating Artists:

Agneta Östlund, Amy Paul, Ann Olsen, Anna Stump, Anna Zappoli, Anne De Geer, Åsa Kvissberg, Berit Hammarbäck, Bhavna Mehta, Bibi Davidson, Caroline Färnström, Catherine Ruane, Cathy Immordino, Cecilia Uhlin, Chenhung Chen, Christina Ruthger,, Cindy Zimmerman, Dani Dodge, Daphne Hill, Diane Williams, Dwora Fried, Emily Blythe Jones, Emily Wiseman, Erika Lizée, Ginger Rosser, Grace Gray-Adams, Hannah Johansen, Hasti Radpoor, Helen Redman, Irene Abraham, Isabelle Nilsson, Jane Szabo, Janice Grinsell, Jeanne Dunn, Jennifer Bennett, Jenny Treece Jorup, JJ L’Heureux, Judy Christensen, Kathi McCord, Kathleen Mitchell, Kathy Miller, Kathy Nida, Kim Niehans, Kit Aaboe, Kristine Schomaker, Lauren Carrera, Lena Möller, Lena Wiklund, Linda Litteral, Linda Rae Coughlin, Lisa Hutton, Marina Holmberg, Moya Devine, Nilly Gill, Nurit Avesar, Petrina Cooper, Pia Göransson-Lie, Prudence Horne, Randi Leirnes, Randi Matushevitz, Samantha Fields, Samuelle Richardson, Sheli Silverio, Stacie Birky-Greene, Stephanie Bedwell, Susan Amorde, Susan Osborn, Susan T. Kurland, Terri Hughes-Oelrich, Terrilynn Quick, Yasmine Diaz

 

 

Scott Froschauer’s “Word on the Street” public art project featured on ABC7 news

 

Scott Froschauer
Word on The Street

 

On ABC7 News

In the LA TImes

scottfroschauer.com
shoeboxpr.com

For more info and a map to the signs

By utilizing the materials and visual language of street signs, Los Angeles-based artist Scott Froschauer is able to harness the power of authority while playing with viewers understanding and perception of public space and the role of art in it. By replacing the traditional controlling language on public street signs with positive life-affirming statements, The Word on The Street seeks to provide something that is missing from our hum-drum daily visual diet.

Scattered throughout and sponsored by the city of Glendale, California, Froschauer has placed 20 different custom street signs all over, hoping to engage and inspire city visitors and residents to see the world just a little bit brighter. The signs range in message and tone, but maintain the standard directional sign styles and shapes. Touching on positivity, curiosity and absurdity, Froschauer’s signs are evocative, supportive and whimsical, inspiring a smirk or smile to all those who view them.

Juxtaposing the expectations of passersby, Froschauer is particularly fascinated with the role of the public space—hoping to combat the common thought that public space is meant to host signage and messaging to control and conform people in order to keep things copasetic and peaceful among the masses. Froschauer has utilized this expectation in order to produce a positive and shocking response from his viewers. Applying the power of street art to the concept of public signage, he has found an untapped area of captivation in contemporary art where the street art is not a visually rebellious statement, illegally operating and going against the system. Instead, Froschauer employs a contextual rebellion from the mundane messaging but still utilizes the government-approved signage style in order to gain proper attention from viewers as well as utilize the positive shock value of his opposing messages.

These signs are so similar to the traditional street signs that many people pass right by them without even realizing the signs say something different than they expected. This aha moment is a mandatory aspect of Froschauer’s work, demanding the viewers’ participation to complete this experiential artwork.

Aiming to give viewers a positive yet momentary emotional lift, Froschauer hopes that people who see his signs start to expect extraordinary things in ordinary places more often, evoking greater imagination and positivity by the masses. His messaging in The Words on The Street are simple yet thought provoking, with self-love and compassion at the core of his sign statements. With just 20 new additions to the city’s public space, Glendale now offers all visitors and residents a boost of positive energy and personal empowerment.

In the LA TImes

About the artist:
Scott Froschauer is a experimental artist and art fabricator in Los Angeles. His background consists of a structured education in Engineering, Photography, Computer Programming and Business. He earned a B.A. in Theoretical Linguistics from Syracuse University and has broad practical experience in Fabrication, Design, Non-ordinary Reality, Experiential Narrative, Venture Capital, Counterfeiting and Breathing. His background in the motion picture industry as a Key Grip has given him the skills to rapidly deploy large engineering projects for television shows, feature films, commercials and music videos. His fine artwork covers a broad range of subjects and materials from ephemeral street art and experiential narrative events to gunpowder illustration and alternative technique photography to practical sculpture and many large scale pieces for the Burning Man Festival, including the fabrication of The Church Trap, a large scale sculpture which was featured in numerous publications. Scott also fabricated RuckusRoots’ 2015 Wild Art sculpture, for the LA Zoo.

Dani Dodge’s Fugitive Love Song at A.I.R. Gallery

Dani Dodge’s Fugitive Love Song at A.I.R. Gallery

A.I.R. Gallery
October 12 to November 12, 2017
Opening Reception: 6-8 p.m. Friday, October 13, 2017

 

A.I.R. Gallery is pleased to announce Fugitive Love Song by Los Angeles-based artist Dani Dodge. Dodge has exhibited her work extensively at museums and galleries throughout the West Coast. This is her first solo exhibition in New York City.

Fugitive Love Song documents Dodge’s 2016 guerrilla art project carried out in locations throughout Los Angeles and places she visited, including New York. For 366 days, using lipstick, spray paint, markers and printed flyers, Dodge surreptitiously (and sometimes shamelessly) spread a singular message: “# Just the way you are.” By distilling a potent message of affirmation through this iconic song lyric, Dodge used her public intervention to insert small, fleeting moments of joy into the otherwise chaotic tempo of everyday life.

“2015 had been a tough year for me emotionally,” Dodge said. “The fact that people could take then-candidate Donald Trump seriously after his misogynist attacks on women such as Rosie O’Donnell, Carly Fiorina and Megyn Kelly caused me to question this country I love. I was struggling. I knew others were as well.”

“If there was ever a time for a sappy love song message to be shared with other women in the world, this was it.”

By combining the saturated sweetness of the phrase with the often-illegal means of sharing it on bathroom mirrors, street signs and sidewalks, Dodge’s project provided unexpected “fugitive” moments of encouragement intended as a momentary refuge from a judgmental world.

For her solo show at A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn, Dodge sewed photographs of each day’s message into clouds she posts on the walls, along with mirrors. The mirrors — with the same phrase written onto them — are perfect for the self-affirmation selfie the gallery patron has always needed. Because you know what? You are great Just The Way You Are.

Working with themes surrounding identity, forgiveness and social justice, Dodge creates immersive, interactive environments and installations that incorporate video, paint and performance. In 2016, Americans for the Arts named Dodge’s interactive installation/performance “CONFESS” one of the outstanding public art projects of the previous year. She has had more than 14 solo shows since 2008. Her 2017 solo show “Personal Territories,” an interactive installation at the Lancaster Museum of Art and History, included four performance art pieces that activated different areas of the community.

A.I.R. Gallery is located at 155 Plymouth Street, Brooklyn, NY. It is open Wednesday through Sunday 12-6 p.m.

Dani Dodge, Personal Territories. MOAH

Dani Dodge’s “Personal Territories” maps out a new way of looking at home

 

When we are young, we want nothing more than to get away from home. As we age, some of us want nothing more than to be home. Dani Dodge’s installation maps her own history of home and encourages visitors to consider their own tales of personal territory.

Opening June 17 at MOAH:CEDAR, “Personal Territories” is a room-sized interactive installation that incorporates video and sculpture while allowing members of the public to contemplate their own memories of home.

Dodge is known for crafting evocative interactive works that reflect ideas of home, formation of identity, and the secrets we hide in public and private spaces. She explores how many layers of transparency are required before opacity occurs.

Opening reception: 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday June 17, 2017
Location: MOAH:CEDAR, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, California
Exhibition runs through August 5, 2017
Hours: 2 to 8 p.m. Thursday through Sunday
Cost: Free
Additional events: The exhibition will include four events—July 1, 8, 15, and 22—outside of the museum walls to engage the community in a dialogue about the personal territory we all tread.

To create the work, the artist, who grew up in California, relearned the art of sewing, something she abandoned after doing poorly in home economics at age 14. She re-creates her childhood bed in clear vinyl and shades of translucent fabric, hanging it from the museum ceiling. Each piece is a striation in her journey. Threads dangle from the seams.

A time-lapse video, reminiscent of Dodge’s childhood territory, projects onto and through the objects. It is at once visible and obscured as it plays upon the surfaces.

The installation allows the public to wander through this ephemeral representation of Dodge’s personal history, rendered in dreamlike colors and textures that at once conceal and reveal the details of her youth.

Sculptures made from the skins of mattresses dot the room. Visitors are invited to share their own childhood memories and ideas of home on wood blocks—one of the most solid items within the room—and hide them in shoeboxes under the bed.

Inspired by her personal history as a war correspondent, political journalist, and a young single mother who at one point lived in a car with two infants, the artist’s sculptures and installations reveal a range of powerful themes, including identity, memory, the fragility of home, and the nature of truth. At the same time, Dodge’s installation seduces viewers with its delicate monumentality and subtle but perilous beauty.

While no less contemplative, her “Personal Territories” public performances will be a celebration of community and home. At locations throughout Lancaster, she invites the public to share their own truths with her and others. The paper airplanes, drawings, and stories that result from the encounters will be on view at MOAH:CEDAR.

Dani Dodge, Personal Territories. MOAH

Personal Territories: Events
Interactive art with Dani Dodge

Saturday, July 1, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.: Joe Davies Heritage Airpark
Horizons Beyond the Homefront
Participants fold paper planes, write where they want to go on them and toss them into the “horizon.”

Saturday, July 8, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.: Prime Desert Woodlands
The Earth Is My Home
Participants fill in a 4-foot-tall image of the Earth with their thoughts and drawings of what the planet means to them.

Saturday, July 15, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.: Los Angeles County Library – Lancaster
The Setting for my Story Is Home
We all have a story to tell. Participants tell the artist a short story about their home, wherever or whatever it is. The artist creates a title for the story and types it on a vintage library reference card that the participant then files into a library card file.

Saturday, July 22, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.: Western Hotel Museum
Home as Heritage
Visitors to the museum think about their own heritage. They share the name of a relative who was a foundation of their family and a short story about that person. The artist types the story in no more than three sentences on parchment paper that becomes a “book.”

Bio: Dani Dodge lives and works in Los Angeles. Her work is included in three museum collections and has been shown across the U.S. and internationally. In 2016, Americans for the Arts named Dodge’s interactive installation/performance “CONFESS” one of the outstanding public art projects of the previous year.
She is a former newspaper reporter who was part of a team that won the Pulitzer Prize for exposing congressional corruption in 2006. She was embedded with the Marines during the invasion of Iraq in 2003, and covered the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. She left journalism in 2008 to focus on art.

Websites: DaniDodge.com & lancastermoah.org
Events on Facebook: Personal Territories & CEDARFEST

Note: Dodge’s opening reception is being held in conjunction with the 32nd Annual All-Media Juried Arts Festival, CEDARFEST, hosted by the Lancaster Museum of Art & History (MOAH) and MOAH:CEDAR.

Dani Dodge, Personal Territories. MOAH

danidodge_bricks2

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Dani Dodge | Afterfear

Solo Exhibition

HB Punto Experimental

2151 Logan Ave. Section B (alley entrance) San Diego, California

Opening reception: December 10, 2016 6 to 9 p.m.

On view December 10, 2016, to February 11, 2017

 

(San Diego) – Dani Dodge’s work confronts emotion. It invites people to write, to burn, to tear, to throw. It requires participants to reveal. “Afterfear” is an installation created from the ghosts of her exhibitions past.

Visitors are invited into a room to witness the remnants of fear, and contemplate, who are these residual ghosts? Are they us?

Dodge is a Los Angeles installation artist. Her work often incorporates interactive elements that require participants to reveal personal truths, and in doing so recognize our shared human frailties. She has burned people’s fears, thrown people’s burdens into the ocean, and typed people’s sins for the purpose of posting them publicly.

As part of shows in the past year, Dodge had invited people to tear the wallpaper off the walls and write their fears upon the scraps. Dodge burned those fears. What remained on these walls were abstract designs as deeper and deeper scraping revealed earlier and earlier vintages of wallpaper.

In “Afterfear,” the gallery walls will be covered with the remains of this torn vintage wallpaper, which has also been desecrated with graffiti. Other walls in the gallery will be built with glass bricks that encase the ashes of the fears burned in previous exhibitions.

Visitors to HB Punto Experimental will be invited to walk through these remains to a blank wall in the back. But to get there, they must navigate over and around a garden of totems—both abstract and figurative—which represent emotions explored in previous shows, including

burdens, sins, and failure. Dodge creates these totems from the antithesis of traditional red cedar: Styrofoam discards.

Once visitors reach the blank wall, they will write down what haunts them on slips of wallpaper and glue them to create a new wall. This new art, a creation of people’s specters, will be used again in a future exhibition.

“If we can never extinguish our fears, we have to learn to live among them,” Dodge said.

Dodge’s work is part of three museum collections, and she has solo shows scheduled in 2017 at the New Museum Los Gatos in Los Gatos, Calif., the Museum of Art and History in Lancaster, Calif., and A.I.R Gallery in Brooklyn, New York.  http://www.DaniDodge.com

danidodge_afterfear2