“ECHO ENIGMA” – SCOTT FROSCHAUER’S NEW SOLO EXHIBITION CONFRONTS DIVISIVENESS IN AMERICA

AN ARTIST TALK SUNDAY, MAY 20TH, 3-5 P.M.
ALTADENA OPEN STUDIOS TOUR, JUNE 3RD 11-5 P.M.
CLOSING RECEPTION ON JUNE 10TH, 2-5 P.M.

Ark Gallery and Studios is pleased to present a solo exhibit with Los Angeles multimedia artist Scott Froschauer. The artist explores themes of social connectivity, community and complexity. Froschauer gained notoriety with his “The Word on The Street” series of subversively positive street signs.

In Froschauer’s latest exhibit at ARK, the artist reflects on America’s increasingly polarized climate, etching distressed mirrors with portraits of various historical American figures. The artist injects elements that complicate otherwise one-dimensional narratives. He states that, “Deciding how to categorize them becomes more of a statement about the viewer, who is reflected in the distressed surface of each piece.” Hero and villain become blurred in the complex reality of the subjects humanity.

That complexity becomes the underlying fabric of the shows centerpiece. The exhibit’s focal point is a model for a large-scale artwork entitled United Divider that proposes a size of 15 feet tall by 20 feet long. Reminiscent of Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc that infamously overtook Federal Plaza in New York in the 1980’s, the 120-foot-long curved steel panel divided an otherwise open public space and was eventually taken down due to public outcry. Froschauer proposes a monument of polished stainless steel, waving, and etched with the likeness of the American flag. When viewed up close, the flag’s stars and stripes consist of lines of text bearing the names of historical Americans, human beings who we might find ourselves simplifying into heroes or villains, but which are actually more complex. Again, the polished surface reminds the viewer that their impression of these individuals is more of a reflection of their own preconceptions. Froschauer comments, “The epic scale of this piece gives it a stance as a wall, separating those who might stand on either side of it. The reflective quality of the piece denotes that this idea of America is a reflection of all who observe it. The symbol of the flag brings us all together and tears us all apart. It is the United Divider.”

Several related events will follow the April 29th opening from 3-6 p.m. including a May 20th artist talk from 3-5 p.m., an Altadena Open Studios Tour day on 3rd from 11-5 p.m., and a closing reception on June 10th from 2-5 p.m.

Ark Gallery and Studios is located at 2599 Fair Oaks Ave., Altadena, CA 91001

 

 

SEARCHING
Kathryn Hart

May 2-30, 2018
School of Visual Arts Project Spaces CE
NY, NY

The School of Visual Arts (SVA) presents Searching, a solo show by artist Kathryn Hart. The exhibition will be on view from May 2-30, 2018 in the Project Spaces CE locations at 209 East 23rd Street, Main floor, and 380 2nd Ave, 8th floor. This is Hart’s first solo show at the SVA.

In this solo exhibition, Hart explores the web of emotions confronted in the search to begin anew, and the burden of choice. She continues her dialogue with evolving identity and the hope for new beginnings amidst a maze of emotional conflict, pain, and self-doubt.

Hart offers, “after life leaves us tumbled upside down, completely derailed, we pick ourselves up and begin the search for…personal truth, enlightenment, growth, love, connections, a place to feel comfortable, a place to call home. We even search for the place to start the search. My flightpath was obliterated by an onslaught of happenings – my husband’s cancer, the deaths of both my parents, and my own struggle with an ongoing disease and trauma. How do I move forward?

The search starts with one intent, one thought, one moment, one breath, one catalyst, one cell, one dot. A series of dots, actions, sparks, ideas, or energy becomes a line, a trajectory. Lines reveal potential paths ahead and scars of the ones just followed.”

Kathryn Hart presents this theme across an array of media, which further illustrates the plethora of options for the journey. An on-site installation of hundreds of lines, wires and embedded glass lenses explores the miasma of available routes, some more circuitous and arduous, some involving forced self-reflection. Hart uses these laboriously hand tied knots and line to translate a period of unsettling uncertainty into a path to move forward. Shadowy lines hover behind the actual as beacons or footprints. Ink drawings, reminiscent of ancient cave drawings, indicate the inception of thought and movement. Abstract black and white photographs of found bones allude to structure, life, and an archeological excavation for hidden meanings. There is simplicity and strength in their starkness. The exhibition also includes complex hanging sculptures with line and objects embedded into dense surfaces. In all the presented artworks, Hart examines the dichotomies of movement and stillness, contemplation and decision, and space and line, and the importance of the duality in the search.

“Line represents journey, connections, strength, simplicity, scars, tethers, and choice. Knots can be entanglements, junctures, bindings, obstacles, hurdles, gates and coupling.  I learned suture knots from my plastic surgeon father. His knots would both join and conceal.”

Hart delves into the tension between the search and choice, and ultimately, personal accountability. “We are bound by the choices we make. In the end, my search and its discoveries are all up to me.”

“I am inspired by many artists, particularly the poetry and bravery of Eva Hesse, the bold structures of Lee Bontecou, and the power and personal revelations of Louise Bourgeois.”

Kathryn Hart is a multi-disciplinary artist who exhibits frequently in New York City, throughout Europe, and most recently, Los Angeles. Museum, solo and group shows include Ateneo de Madrid (Madrid, Spain), Howland Cultural Center (Beacon, NY), IDEA Space/Colorado College, Andre Zarre Gallery (NYC), the Chelsea Art Museum (NYC), ArtHaus (Denver), Galerie SD Szucha 8 (Warsaw), Galeria 33 (Poland), Zamek w Goluchowie, (Poland), Myslenice Cultural Center (Poland), the Oceanside Museum of Art (CA), Museo de Castello de Estense (Italy), The Mitchell Museum (MD), Southern Nevada Museum of Fine Arts (Las Vegas), and the Colorado History Museum.

Her artwork is in the public collections of the Ministry of Culture of France, the Ministry of Culture of Poland, the Southern Nevada Museum of Fine Arts, the Myslenice Cultural Center (Poland), and many private collections worldwide.

International awards include scholarships from the Council of Europe (2016), and the Ministries of Art and Culture of France and Poland (2015, 2014), and the United Nations Harmony for Peace Award (2010).

Hart is a member of A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn, NY. She holds a B.A. from Boston University, an MBA from the University of Texas at Arlington, and has extended studies in art from the School of Visual Arts in NYC and the City of London Polytechnic. Hart lives in Colorado.

For more information, contact Nika Lopez at ceartwork@sva.edu 212-592-2050. http://www.sva.edu/ce

Hours are Monday-Saturday, 9am-9pm. The artist is available for private discussion and tours from May 20-May 29. Contact Kathryn Hart directly at 214-363-4025 or hart.kathrynd@gmail.com. Visit http://www.KathrynDHart.com for more information.

 

SoCalMFA 2018

Hosted by Claremont Graduate University
Juried by Howard N. Fox

Opening reception: Sunday, March 25, 2-6 pm
Exhibit on view from March 24 – June 2, 2018

Millard Sheets Art Center (at the Fairplex)
1101 W. McKinley Avenue, Pomona, CA 91768

Gallery Hours: Saturday and Sunday, 10–5pm
By appointment only Monday through Friday.

To make an appointment, contact Thomas Canavan at canavan@fairplex.com
or email the SoCalMFA team at socalmfa@gmail.com

SoCalMFA reflects an increasingly diversified portrait of emerging artists in L.A.

This year’s SoCalMFA organizers, in conjunction with the Millard Sheets Art Center and Claremont Graduate University, are pleased to announce the third and largest annual Southern California MFA exhibition in Millard Sheets’ newly-renovated facility. Juried by Howard N. Fox, the exhibit captures 42 artists representing 17 Southern California MFA programs, using media that includes painting, fabric, sculpture, video, photography, installation, drawing, mixed-media, and more. Taken together, this exhibit is a barometer of the diverse critical and aesthetic concerns that will shape artistic production in Southern California for years to come. The exhibition also reflects Claremont’s Graduate University’s leadership as a center for artistic and cultural production in Southern California at the graduate level.

This year’s SoCal MFA organizing team is made up of former and current Claremont Graduate University students Madeline Arnault, Chelsea Boxwell, and Megan Kinney. The exhibition is the largest MFA exhibition in both number of works exhibited and number of schools represented. The 2018 exhibition includes 17 out of 18 eligible MFA programs in Southern California.

Since 2016, the SoCalMFA exhibit has called upon a guest juror to select works and curate, beginning with Steve Comba (2016) and Amanda Ross-Ho (2017). This year the juror will be Howard N. Fox, an independent curator and former Curator of Contemporary Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA).

We invite the public to explore this exhibition’s complex perspectives and overlapping themes and invite you to attend the exhibit’s opening reception on Sunday, March 25, from 2-6 p.m.

Accompanying the exhibition will be a public panel led by CGU Professor of Art Theory and History and LA Times art critic David Pagel. The panel will be free and open to the public and will address the culture of the MFA program. Selected artists from the exhibition will join Pagel in this discussion with a Q&A session from the audience. Dates and times will be posted on the Fairplex website and SoCalMFA’s Facebook Page. Please stay tuned for more information.

Participating artists: Madeline Arnault (Claremont Graduate University), Diego Barrientos (Cal Arts), Aurora Berger (Claremont Graduate University), Deitra Charles (Claremont Graduate University), Patricia Chow (Claremont Graduate University), Ji Soo Chung (UCLA), Carey Coleman (UCLA), Remi Dalton (Cal State San Diego), Yubo Dong (UC Irvine), Stevan Dupas (Cal State Long Beach), Jenny Eisenpresser (Art Center College of Design), Samantha Fitzmorris (Claremont Graduate University), Leslie Frank (Claremont Graduate University), Joshua Freeman (Azusa Pacific University), Molly Gabbard (Cal State San Diego), Eleanor Greer (Cal State San Diego), Timothy Haerens (Cal State San Bernardino), Harrison Halaska (Laguna College of Art and Design), Allison Holland (Cal State Fullerton), Lucy Holtsnider (UC Santa Barbara), Anna Laleggio (UC Irvine), Chloe Jeongmyo Kim (Otis College of Art and Design), Aleya Lanteigne (Cal State Sand Diego), Jian Liang (Claremont Graduate University), Jane Margarette (UCLA), Michelle Nunes (Cal State Northridge), Shane McClatchey (Laguna College of Art and Design), Moses Muturi (Cal State San Diego), Aydinaneth Ortiz (Cal Arts), Joshua Rains (Univeristy of Southern California), Rebecca Rich (Claremont Graduate University), Celia Rocha (Otis College of Art and Design), Heather Roessler (Cal State San Bernardino), Cintia Segovia (Cal State Long Beach), Kamaria Shepherd (UCLA), Nicole Waszak (Cal State San Diego), Charisse Weston (UC Irvine), Amy Williams (Cal State Long Beach), Ji Hyun Won (University of California Riverside), Jonathan Yacoub (Claremont Graduate University), Zebulon Zang (UC San Diego), and Benjamin Zhao (Claremont Graduate University).

Instagram
@socalmfa
Hosted by: @cgumfa, @claremontgraduateuniversity
Location: @millardsheetsartcenter #millardsheetsartcenter
Curated by: Madeline Arnault (@madimaud), Chelsea Boxwell (@chelseabox_art), and Megan Kinney (@megzykin)

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SoCalMFA
CGU Art
Claremont Graduate University
Millard Sheet Arts Center

About Howard N. Fox
From 1985 through 2008, Fox has organized numerous major exhibitions and authored their catalogues. Some of his exhibits include Avant-Garde in the Eighties (1987), A Primal Spirit: Ten Contemporary Japanese Sculptors (1990), Lari Pittman (1996), and Eleanor Antin (1999). Fox recently returned to LACMA as guest curator for the critically acclaimed survey exhibition Playing with Fire: Paintings by Carlos Almaraz.

About David Pagel
In addition to his position at CGU, Pagel is an adjunct curator at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, New York. He also writes regularly for the Los Angeles Times. Since 1988, he has published reviews, features, and essays in Artforum, Art in America, Flash Art, frieze, and Art Issues, where he was reviews editor from 1998 to 2001.

About CGU Art and the School of Arts & Humanities
The School of Arts & Humanities is home to a unique approach to graduate education, offering students the opportunity to study in and across disciplines as they “follow the problem.” Its research and teaching transcend academic boundaries and disregard the artificial divides between theory and application. Intimate seminar-style classes mean students build close working relationships with faculty-mentors, who in turn will help them thrive academically and launch meaningful careers.

About Fairplex and the Millard Sheets Art Center

Through its exhibitions, educational programs, events and workshops, the Millard Sheets Art Center provides the community with meaningful experiences within the world of visual arts. As part of The Learning Centers at Fairplex, the center engages the community at multiple levels of education and its exhibitions promote the rich and diverse cultures that lie within Los Angeles County and Southern California. Fairplex is an educational and entertainment complex that is home to the L.A. County Fair and 500 year-round events.

Allison Holland, CSUF

 

Rebecca Rich, CGU

 

Diego Barrientos, Calarts

JJ LHeureux
Nude Male Maids
Venice, California

Feminism Now

Visual Art Exhibition by the Feminist Image Group, Shoebox Projects and Krogen Amerika

Shoebox Projects, Los Angeles
1660 South Avenue 21 #3
Los Angeles, California, CA 90031
http://www.shoeboxprojects.com
https://www.facebook.com/shoeboxprojects/

 

The exhibition will run Feb 24 – March 11, 2018
Opening Reception: opening Sunday Feb 25, 3-6pm
Gallery hours by appointment
All events free and open to the public.

http://fig-art.blogspot.com/

Members of the San Diego Feminist Image Group, Shoebox Projects and the Swedish Group Krogen Amerika present artworks that explore multiple visions of what feminism is today, in the context of Southern California and Northern Europe. Artists address the complexity of gender equality through themes such as sexism, body image, class, race, politics, spirituality, domesticity, biology, and history.

This exhibition will travel to Stockholm, Sweden in May 2018.

The public is invited to attend the opening reception on Sunday, February 25, from 3-6pm at Shoebox Projects in the Brewery Arts Complex, Los Angeles. Artists will be present to engage the public.

The Feminist Image Group was formed in 2009. FIG is a coalition of San Diego visual artists who meet to discuss art, see exhibitions, and support one another in our careers. We work across many media, including drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, installation, digital media and performance. The group has had exhibitions at San Diego Mesa College, Art Produce Gallery, Hyde Gallery at Grossmont College, Art San Diego Artfair, and has an upcoming exhibition at the Women’s Museum of California.
“Krogen Amerika” is the name of a Swedish printmaking group in the region of Östergötland in Sweden. The group works out of a a red wooden house from 1704 in the very center of the Swedish city of Linköping. During the years, it has functioned as a private home, a local pub, and a meeting place for emigrants to America (hence the name of the house, “Krogen Amerika”). Now it is a fully functional printmaking studio and art gallery. This artist-run gallery and studio space is partly funded by the city of Linköping. About 20 artists work here, and also together manage the space, with the support from the local community. The gallery exhibits artists from all over Sweden. Krogen America has exhibited as a group at Norrköpings Museum, Östergötlands Museum, Grafiska Sällskapet, the Palo Alto City Hall, Odense Konsthall Danmark, Berlin Kunstfactor.

Participating Artists:

Agneta Östlund, Amy Paul, Ann Olsen, Anna Stump, Anna Zappoli, Anne De Geer, Åsa Kvissberg, Berit Hammarbäck, Bhavna Mehta, Bibi Davidson, Caroline Färnström, Catherine Ruane, Cathy Immordino, Cecilia Uhlin, Chenhung Chen, Christina Ruthger,, Cindy Zimmerman, Dani Dodge, Daphne Hill, Diane Williams, Dwora Fried, Emily Blythe Jones, Emily Wiseman, Erika Lizée, Ginger Rosser, Grace Gray-Adams, Hannah Johansen, Hasti Radpoor, Helen Redman, Irene Abraham, Isabelle Nilsson, Jane Szabo, Janice Grinsell, Jeanne Dunn, Jennifer Bennett, Jenny Treece Jorup, JJ L’Heureux, Judy Christensen, Kathi McCord, Kathleen Mitchell, Kathy Miller, Kathy Nida, Kim Niehans, Kit Aaboe, Kristine Schomaker, Lauren Carrera, Lena Möller, Lena Wiklund, Linda Litteral, Linda Rae Coughlin, Lisa Hutton, Marina Holmberg, Moya Devine, Nilly Gill, Nurit Avesar, Petrina Cooper, Pia Göransson-Lie, Prudence Horne, Randi Leirnes, Randi Matushevitz, Samantha Fields, Samuelle Richardson, Sheli Silverio, Stacie Birky-Greene, Stephanie Bedwell, Susan Amorde, Susan Osborn, Susan T. Kurland, Terri Hughes-Oelrich, Terrilynn Quick, Yasmine Diaz

 

 

Cynthia Minet
Migrations

International Museum of Art and Science (IMAS)
1900 W Nolana Ave McAllen, Texas 78504
http://theimasonline.org
http://cynthiaminet.com/

April 14th to September 2nd, 2018
Public reception April 14th 3-5pm

Open Studio at the Brewery
660 South Avenue 21 #10 LA Ca 90031
Sunday March 4th 2-5pm

Facebook event

 

(McAllen, Texas) – Los Angeles artist Cynthia Minet is pleased to present Migrations, a one-person exhibition at The International Museum of Art and Science (IMAS) in McAllen, Texas, from April 14th to September 2nd, 2018.

Migrations takes borderland regions of the Rio Grande Valley as its point of departure and specifically uses the Roseate Spoonbill, a large bird native to the Southeast coastal region as an artistic surrogate for human experiences. Minet is well known for the creation of large-scale sculptures of animals constructed from repurposed plastics—detergent bottles, water containers, found toys, etc. that are then illuminated from within by glowing LED lights. She creates magnificent aesthetic objects that metaphorically call attention to our dependency on electricity and petrochemicals. Her conceptually and politically astute artworks draw the audience in, and then prompt them to thoughtfully consider and question contemporary society and lifestyle.

In Migrations, Minet will exhibit five suspended sculptures and one floor piece in addition to select wall-mounted drawings. Like most of her installations, this work is site-responsive, and uses recycled plastic debris from Los Angeles in addition to found materials gathered from the borderlands region of the Rio Grande Valley. The center piece of the installation is a graceful representation of the Roseate Spoonbill in various stages of flight. These sculptural birds are accompanied by light sequencing and motion activated sound that consists of wing beats, running water, bird calls and footsteps through grass that create a sense of mystery and movement in the darkened space. In addition, embedded into these sculptures are artifacts dropped by migrants who have crossed the border fence or the Rio Grande River into Texas. Minet’s visually accessible, meaningful and richly layered works call attention to the fact that plastic will erode but never disappear, that habitats and species will be lost to climate change and pollution and never return, and that people will risk everything to escape intolerable situations only to be denied entry into a new land.

Cynthia Minet’s artworks have been exhibited both in the USA and internationally. Her recent solo exhibitions include: Avian, Vita Art Center at the Bell Arts Factory, Ventura (2016); Beast of Burden, USC Fisher Museum of Art, University of Southern California (2015); Packing Caravan, the Los Angeles International Airport, (2013), Unsustainable Creatures, UC Riverside’s Culver Center for the Arts (2012), as well as installations at the Anchorage Museum, AK (2014), the Huntington Beach Art Center, the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History, and at GATE Projects, Glendale. International group exhibitions include museum and gallery shows since 2000. Minet is professor of studio art at Moorpark College, Moorpark, CA.

Monica Wyatt
Continuum

Solo exhibition

Opening reception: January 20, 2018 6-8pm
On view: January 20 to March 3, 2018

MOAH: Cedar
44857 Cedar Ave
Lancaster, CA 93534

lancastermoah.org
monicawyatt.com

(Lancaster, California) – The Museum of Art and History in Lancaster, California, is pleased to present Continuum, a solo exhibition by Los Angeles based artist Monica Wyatt.

The curator of the exhibition, jill moniz, writes in an essay, “Monica Wyatt is an artistic alchemist, collecting materials and turning them into precious objects. In this process, Wyatt fuses the history of the materials together to create new beginnings, representing the cyclic nature of all things. This exhibition is a metanarrative of this practice, where Wyatt continues to reimagine objects and compositions that speak forcefully about her inspirations, interventions and intentions.

Wyatt is passionate in her hunt for materials, honoring the histories of these elements whilst stripping them bare so that her reworking feels organic and never forced. She dissembles organs, pianos, cables, sieves and other utilitarian items from a past when people valued human production and craftsmanship. Her objects honor that past and create a new language on an aesthetic continuum that conveys the resonance of an alchemy that we all possess, and reminds the viewer that identity and community are made from diverse elements brought together in harmony.

In another layer of synergy, Wyatt is interested in transforming inorganic materials into shapes that signify nature. Her assemblage is filled with both organic and manmade materials and she challenges the viewer to consider the aesthetic qualities of each as they contribute to her compositions. She makes electric capacitors look like plant life and zip ties mimic deep sea life in order to further a dialog about preservation of all the things we should hold dear.”

MOAH Cedar presents Continuum, Wyatt’s first installation at the museum and the ongoing collaboration with curator jill moniz. Wyatt’s assemblage has evolved from the early influence of Joseph Cornell to a more outside of the box approach. She credits Betye Saar, Claire Falkenstein, Ruth Asawa, Louise Bourgeois, Eva Hesse and Lee Bontecou with giving her the courage and impetus to pursue engaging themes and compositions that reflect her love for materials, and the new life and meaning she gives them.

Scott Froschauer’s “Word on the Street” public art project featured on ABC7 news

 

Scott Froschauer
Word on The Street

 

On ABC7 News

In the LA TImes

scottfroschauer.com
shoeboxpr.com

For more info and a map to the signs

By utilizing the materials and visual language of street signs, Los Angeles-based artist Scott Froschauer is able to harness the power of authority while playing with viewers understanding and perception of public space and the role of art in it. By replacing the traditional controlling language on public street signs with positive life-affirming statements, The Word on The Street seeks to provide something that is missing from our hum-drum daily visual diet.

Scattered throughout and sponsored by the city of Glendale, California, Froschauer has placed 20 different custom street signs all over, hoping to engage and inspire city visitors and residents to see the world just a little bit brighter. The signs range in message and tone, but maintain the standard directional sign styles and shapes. Touching on positivity, curiosity and absurdity, Froschauer’s signs are evocative, supportive and whimsical, inspiring a smirk or smile to all those who view them.

Juxtaposing the expectations of passersby, Froschauer is particularly fascinated with the role of the public space—hoping to combat the common thought that public space is meant to host signage and messaging to control and conform people in order to keep things copasetic and peaceful among the masses. Froschauer has utilized this expectation in order to produce a positive and shocking response from his viewers. Applying the power of street art to the concept of public signage, he has found an untapped area of captivation in contemporary art where the street art is not a visually rebellious statement, illegally operating and going against the system. Instead, Froschauer employs a contextual rebellion from the mundane messaging but still utilizes the government-approved signage style in order to gain proper attention from viewers as well as utilize the positive shock value of his opposing messages.

These signs are so similar to the traditional street signs that many people pass right by them without even realizing the signs say something different than they expected. This aha moment is a mandatory aspect of Froschauer’s work, demanding the viewers’ participation to complete this experiential artwork.

Aiming to give viewers a positive yet momentary emotional lift, Froschauer hopes that people who see his signs start to expect extraordinary things in ordinary places more often, evoking greater imagination and positivity by the masses. His messaging in The Words on The Street are simple yet thought provoking, with self-love and compassion at the core of his sign statements. With just 20 new additions to the city’s public space, Glendale now offers all visitors and residents a boost of positive energy and personal empowerment.

In the LA TImes

About the artist:
Scott Froschauer is a experimental artist and art fabricator in Los Angeles. His background consists of a structured education in Engineering, Photography, Computer Programming and Business. He earned a B.A. in Theoretical Linguistics from Syracuse University and has broad practical experience in Fabrication, Design, Non-ordinary Reality, Experiential Narrative, Venture Capital, Counterfeiting and Breathing. His background in the motion picture industry as a Key Grip has given him the skills to rapidly deploy large engineering projects for television shows, feature films, commercials and music videos. His fine artwork covers a broad range of subjects and materials from ephemeral street art and experiential narrative events to gunpowder illustration and alternative technique photography to practical sculpture and many large scale pieces for the Burning Man Festival, including the fabrication of The Church Trap, a large scale sculpture which was featured in numerous publications. Scott also fabricated RuckusRoots’ 2015 Wild Art sculpture, for the LA Zoo.