JJ LHeureux
Nude Male Maids
Venice, California

Feminism Now

Visual Art Exhibition by the Feminist Image Group, Shoebox Projects and Krogen Amerika

Shoebox Projects, Los Angeles
1660 South Avenue 21 #3
Los Angeles, California, CA 90031
http://www.shoeboxprojects.com
https://www.facebook.com/shoeboxprojects/

 

The exhibition will run Feb 24 – March 11, 2018
Opening Reception: opening Sunday Feb 25, 3-6pm
Gallery hours by appointment
All events free and open to the public.

http://fig-art.blogspot.com/

Members of the San Diego Feminist Image Group, Shoebox Projects and the Swedish Group Krogen Amerika present artworks that explore multiple visions of what feminism is today, in the context of Southern California and Northern Europe. Artists address the complexity of gender equality through themes such as sexism, body image, class, race, politics, spirituality, domesticity, biology, and history.

This exhibition will travel to Stockholm, Sweden in May 2018.

The public is invited to attend the opening reception on Sunday, February 25, from 3-6pm at Shoebox Projects in the Brewery Arts Complex, Los Angeles. Artists will be present to engage the public.

The Feminist Image Group was formed in 2009. FIG is a coalition of San Diego visual artists who meet to discuss art, see exhibitions, and support one another in our careers. We work across many media, including drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, installation, digital media and performance. The group has had exhibitions at San Diego Mesa College, Art Produce Gallery, Hyde Gallery at Grossmont College, Art San Diego Artfair, and has an upcoming exhibition at the Women’s Museum of California.
“Krogen Amerika” is the name of a Swedish printmaking group in the region of Östergötland in Sweden. The group works out of a a red wooden house from 1704 in the very center of the Swedish city of Linköping. During the years, it has functioned as a private home, a local pub, and a meeting place for emigrants to America (hence the name of the house, “Krogen Amerika”). Now it is a fully functional printmaking studio and art gallery. This artist-run gallery and studio space is partly funded by the city of Linköping. About 20 artists work here, and also together manage the space, with the support from the local community. The gallery exhibits artists from all over Sweden. Krogen America has exhibited as a group at Norrköpings Museum, Östergötlands Museum, Grafiska Sällskapet, the Palo Alto City Hall, Odense Konsthall Danmark, Berlin Kunstfactor.

Participating Artists:

Agneta Östlund, Amy Paul, Ann Olsen, Anna Stump, Anna Zappoli, Anne De Geer, Åsa Kvissberg, Berit Hammarbäck, Bhavna Mehta, Bibi Davidson, Caroline Färnström, Catherine Ruane, Cathy Immordino, Cecilia Uhlin, Chenhung Chen, Christina Ruthger,, Cindy Zimmerman, Dani Dodge, Daphne Hill, Diane Williams, Dwora Fried, Emily Blythe Jones, Emily Wiseman, Erika Lizée, Ginger Rosser, Grace Gray-Adams, Hannah Johansen, Hasti Radpoor, Helen Redman, Irene Abraham, Isabelle Nilsson, Jane Szabo, Janice Grinsell, Jeanne Dunn, Jennifer Bennett, Jenny Treece Jorup, JJ L’Heureux, Judy Christensen, Kathi McCord, Kathleen Mitchell, Kathy Miller, Kathy Nida, Kim Niehans, Kit Aaboe, Kristine Schomaker, Lauren Carrera, Lena Möller, Lena Wiklund, Linda Litteral, Linda Rae Coughlin, Lisa Hutton, Marina Holmberg, Moya Devine, Nilly Gill, Nurit Avesar, Petrina Cooper, Pia Göransson-Lie, Prudence Horne, Randi Leirnes, Randi Matushevitz, Samantha Fields, Samuelle Richardson, Sheli Silverio, Stacie Birky-Greene, Stephanie Bedwell, Susan Amorde, Susan Osborn, Susan T. Kurland, Terri Hughes-Oelrich, Terrilynn Quick, Yasmine Diaz

 

 

Scott Froschauer’s “Word on the Street” public art project featured on ABC7 news

 

Scott Froschauer
Word on The Street

 

On ABC7 News

In the LA TImes

scottfroschauer.com
shoeboxpr.com

For more info and a map to the signs

By utilizing the materials and visual language of street signs, Los Angeles-based artist Scott Froschauer is able to harness the power of authority while playing with viewers understanding and perception of public space and the role of art in it. By replacing the traditional controlling language on public street signs with positive life-affirming statements, The Word on The Street seeks to provide something that is missing from our hum-drum daily visual diet.

Scattered throughout and sponsored by the city of Glendale, California, Froschauer has placed 20 different custom street signs all over, hoping to engage and inspire city visitors and residents to see the world just a little bit brighter. The signs range in message and tone, but maintain the standard directional sign styles and shapes. Touching on positivity, curiosity and absurdity, Froschauer’s signs are evocative, supportive and whimsical, inspiring a smirk or smile to all those who view them.

Juxtaposing the expectations of passersby, Froschauer is particularly fascinated with the role of the public space—hoping to combat the common thought that public space is meant to host signage and messaging to control and conform people in order to keep things copasetic and peaceful among the masses. Froschauer has utilized this expectation in order to produce a positive and shocking response from his viewers. Applying the power of street art to the concept of public signage, he has found an untapped area of captivation in contemporary art where the street art is not a visually rebellious statement, illegally operating and going against the system. Instead, Froschauer employs a contextual rebellion from the mundane messaging but still utilizes the government-approved signage style in order to gain proper attention from viewers as well as utilize the positive shock value of his opposing messages.

These signs are so similar to the traditional street signs that many people pass right by them without even realizing the signs say something different than they expected. This aha moment is a mandatory aspect of Froschauer’s work, demanding the viewers’ participation to complete this experiential artwork.

Aiming to give viewers a positive yet momentary emotional lift, Froschauer hopes that people who see his signs start to expect extraordinary things in ordinary places more often, evoking greater imagination and positivity by the masses. His messaging in The Words on The Street are simple yet thought provoking, with self-love and compassion at the core of his sign statements. With just 20 new additions to the city’s public space, Glendale now offers all visitors and residents a boost of positive energy and personal empowerment.

In the LA TImes

About the artist:
Scott Froschauer is a experimental artist and art fabricator in Los Angeles. His background consists of a structured education in Engineering, Photography, Computer Programming and Business. He earned a B.A. in Theoretical Linguistics from Syracuse University and has broad practical experience in Fabrication, Design, Non-ordinary Reality, Experiential Narrative, Venture Capital, Counterfeiting and Breathing. His background in the motion picture industry as a Key Grip has given him the skills to rapidly deploy large engineering projects for television shows, feature films, commercials and music videos. His fine artwork covers a broad range of subjects and materials from ephemeral street art and experiential narrative events to gunpowder illustration and alternative technique photography to practical sculpture and many large scale pieces for the Burning Man Festival, including the fabrication of The Church Trap, a large scale sculpture which was featured in numerous publications. Scott also fabricated RuckusRoots’ 2015 Wild Art sculpture, for the LA Zoo.

16931081_10155385252010715_1325643110_oPersonal Narrative

Annenberg Community Beach House Gallery

Group show
Opening reception February 28, 6pm – 8pm
February 28 – June 4, 2017
Artist Talk May 6, 1:30pm – 3pm
Annenberg Community Beach House Gallery
415 Pacific Coast Hwy, Santa Monica, CA 90402
https://www.annenbergbeachhouse.com/

 

Los Angeles (February 2017) – Opening February 28th, the Annenberg Community Beach House Gallery in Santa Monica will host a group show of contemporary artists who share the experience of being outsiders in Donald Trump’s America. In “Personal Narrative”, curators Diane Williams and Sheli Silverio have brought together artists from diverse backgrounds of immigrant diaspora and gender identity.

Intending to stimulate conversation, inspire creativity and increase understanding of contemporary art in the context of today’s society, the curators have collected works that raise issues and question of both cultural and social consciousness. A panel discussion on May 6th underlines this awareness with a dialogue about process and experiences as 21st century artists living and working in Los Angeles.

The work explores materials that promote a sensory experience and story lines from contemporary artists whose works are experimental, provisional, gestural and instinctive. Each artist possesses an individual approach to his or her artistic methods, working and reworking in a range of technique and materials. These themes are examined in their individual bodies of work.

Participating artists: Mardi De Veuve Alexis, Susan Amorde, Terry Arena, Chenhung Chen, Rick Dallago, Bibi Davidson, Dwora Fried, JJ L’heureux, Tom Lasley, Erika Lizee, Randi Matushevitz, Malka Nedivi, Robert Nelson, Linda Sue Price, Kristine Schomaker, Sheli Silverio, Robert Soffian, Diane Williams.

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For Immediate Release

The Girl in the Red Dress

Bibi Davidson
Solo show

 

Los Angeles Art Association/Gallery 825
825 N La Cienega Blvd LA Ca 90069

October 15th – November 18th
Conversations with the artist November 16th 7-9pm

http://bibidavidson.com/
http://laaa.org/

(Los Angeles) – Los Angeles artist Bibi Davidson kept her artwork secret for nearly 30 years. Therapeutic, meditative and cathartic, Davidson’s vivid paintings express the emotions and fears of a traumatic past. Opening October 15th at Los Angeles Art Association/Gallery 825, “The Girl in the Red Dress” shares Davidson’s inner turmoil revealing to us the wounds and scars of our own past.

“Chaos, or balagan, in Hebrew,” says Davidson “is the mess I always feel around me but cannot touch. The characters represent the people in me. Water, as in oceans, is dangerous for me, but also fascinates me by its strength and movement.”

The girl in the red dress is Davidson’s alter ego and her paintings are populated with characters, animals and landscapes that represent aspects of her personality and inner world. She creates a haven for herself where she feels comfortable and unafraid.

Art critic Shana Nys Dambrot says, “Davidson’s unmistakable aesthetic favors saturated colors and thick line-drawing evoking stained glass, graphic novels, and folkloric fairy-tales. She balances competing impulses toward abstraction and narrative, resolving precisely detailed rendering and emotionally charged gesture in exaggerated features, fantastical landscapes, and anthropomorphic creatures.”

In this show, Davidson experiments with lifting her characters and stories out of the flat two-dimensional canvas into the realm of sculpture, releasing them from their sorrow and reclaiming the joy that is our birthright.

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