On Success: Tips for Artists

For whatever your definition of success is

 

Shoebox PR’s manifesto for surviving in the Art World

Find your community or make one
Patience and perseverance
Be easy to work with
Follow Directions
Show Up!
Get Involved
Generosity begets Generosity
Be brave
Be authentic
Make bad art (Thanks Kiel!)
Read/Research – keep looking at art and keep learning about art
Follow-up
Have meaningful experiences
produce good quality and original work
Learn to say no
Don’t be afraid to ask, you may get a yes
“The Only Rule is Work”
You be you – Stay true to your vision and yourself
Compete only with yourself
Keep working (hard)
Stay humble
Consider your endgame (goals, goals, goals)
Be open to the twists and turns on your career path
You can’t sell art if you don’t show your art
Learn to live with rejection. It is not you, it’s them.

Practical info for artists:

Have the best photos possible of your work for submissions
– No reflections, angles, shadows
– make sure the coloring in the photo matches the actual artwork

Use Facebook and Instagram to its fullest potential

Have a mailing list and send out newsletters quarterly

Check your emails/texts/FB messages daily and answer immediately, especially if it pertains to your work.

Have your work ready to hang when dropping it off at the gallery AND have all of the info/paperwork signed and filled out.

Meet Deadlines and promote the shows you are in on social media and in your newsletters.

Support your artist friends, galleries, institutions either by going to the openings, visiting/studio visits during business hours or following and engaging on social media.

Build a large body of work(s) for several shows. Be ready when you are invited to show.

Start a blog on your website to help drive people to your website.

Surround yourself with supportive people

Perfect your elevator speech about your work. Learn to talk about your art in an easy and articulate manner. Be honest, humble, meaningful. Be a storyteller for your work.

Once you set a price for your work, you can never lowe that price. be responsible when pricing your work. Do you want to get it out into the world or keep it close to the vest and only sell limited pieces for more money?

Business outreach is critical – be proactive and follow-up

Have all of your supporting materials, CV, BIO, Artist Statement ready to go at a moments notice. If you don’t have a professional artist statement, hire someone to write it.

Make it easy to buy – have a square reader with you at all times, or venmo AND a price list on your phone. When someone asks you for a price, you can easily look it up.

Pay attention to detail

elegy Orange – a lily for jo cox

Jeffrey Sklan presents images of rich beauty and loss in his botanical series, ELEGY, opening at Kopeikin Gallery June 22nd in Los Angeles. The exhibition, which runs through June 27th, features astonishingly detailed photographic images of flowers in tribute to victims and survivors of mass killings and murders.

The gallery is located in the Culver City Arts District at 2766 S La Cienega Blvd. in Los Angeles.

Jeffrey Sklan presents ELEGY, an exhibition focusing on floral photographic images in a radiant and transformative collection paying tribute to lives lost in mass killings and murders.

Opening Saturday, June 22nd at the Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles, Sklan’s inspiring works expand the boundaries of photographic still life with their lush and evocative depictions of natural beauty. In each image, he draws viewers into the singular world that his artwork represents.

First on view at Photo LA in January, the series draws from the solace the artist finds in the beauty of flowers, the moving poignancy of their all-too-short existence, and their use in memorials for the departed. Using a rich color palette that originated with his admiration for artists such as Velasquez and Rembrandt, Sklan creates depths to his work that resonate with inner light.

He has previously created other floral series, but in ELEGY, he is “paying tribute,” the loveliness of his images serving as a rumination on how all too quickly the beauty of life can be lost. The work has a graceful, deeply spiritual nature that belies the violent reason for its creation. His initial image, “Lily for Orlando,” was “literally created as the crime scene from the Pulse Nightclub was playing out in June 2016. There was no intention of it being anything but a one-off,” Sklan explains. But a month later, 87 people were killed celebrating Bastille Day in Nice. “The enormity of it resulted in another image. And — a project took form,” Sklan says. Recently added pieces memorialize Parkland student Sydney Aiello, Nipsey Hussle, and worshippers in both Sri Lanka, and Poway, Calif.

Sklan describes his most successful images as capturing emotional content to spark a visceral reaction, and reflect what the artist was feeling or thinking, as the shutter released. “I seek to memorialize the essence of what is before me.”

The exhibition is designed to be a traveling show, and Sklan hopes ELEGY will find new venues for exhibitions, defraying shipping and installation costs through print sales, so that “even more people can view it, and, ideally, inspire people to remedy the wrongs they perceive in the communities where they live.”

He notes “The message is simple: we are each, in our own way and according to our capacity, capable of effecting change.”

About Jeffrey Sklan

Jeffrey Sklan is a Los Angeles-based photographic artist shaping images that revere nature, the human experience, color, and natural beauty. He has exhibited at PhotoLA in 2016, 2017, and 2019; his limited edition fine art prints are in the homes of private collectors nationwide. The show at Kopeikin will serve as a proving ground for ELEGY, an exhibition which Sklan hopes will travel to many cities.

Sklan will be present at Kopeikin through the day starting at 12 noon on June 22nd. The opening day reception runs from 6-8 p.m.

For more information, visit http://www.JeffreySklan.com/

About Kopeikin Gallery

Kopeikin Gallery is dedicated to presenting thought-provoking contemporary photography and art. Founded in 1991, the internationally recognized gallery has offered a wide range of photography exhibitions from Diane Arbus to Lee Friedlander, Chris Jordan, and Jill Greenberg.

The gallery is located at 2766 S La Cienega Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90034

For more information, visit https://www.kopeikingallery.com

ELEGY runs June 22 – 27, 2019.

A Lily for Sutherland Church, 5 November 2017, 28 deaths, gunfire

Karen Hochman Brown
Anonymous@theBeach

Solo Exhibition

June 11 – July 6, 2019
Opening Reception — June 15 • 5 – 8 pm
Artist Walkthrough — June 29 • 11 am

TAG Gallery
5458 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
310.829.9556
https://www.taggallery.net/

Gallery Hours:Tuesday – Saturday, 11 am – 5 pm

“I grew up in Santa Barbara and have long had an obsession with people-watching at the beach. Of course I, too, am exposing myself to those who might want to ogle me, yet I do not feel as though I am being observed. I am just one of many enjoying private moments in a very public place. At the shore, I am able to escape the many social norms that confine my behavior. It is the water and the salt air and the sand between my toes that allow me to literally and figuratively strip away my bonds and be free of the mask of daily life. I return to a mental space closer to my natural inclinations. In Anonymous@theBeach, I explore the paradox of seeing and being seen by the multitudes, while still maintaining a sense of privacy.”

Karen Hochman Brown is a photography-based digital artist living in Los Angeles. She uses a graphic synthesizer software program to create custom virtual-paintbrushes, changing settings of endless parameters that react to a visual reference. The brushstrokes are applied one by one based on information such as shape, color, orientation and luminance. In this process, she is not limited to using photographs for reference and can venture into a world of totally algorithmic creations. Results can mimic natural painting styles or come off as purely graphic. In addition to 2-D works, the artist processes images over time to develop animations.

In her solo show Anonymous@theBeach, Karen Hochman Brown features digitally synthesized artworks and animations that show a world where the seen and unseen collide. Figures are perforated allowing the background to show through. Background and foreground interplay as the subjects melt into nothingness.

Anonymous@theBeach will also feature an interactive installation made for the social media age that speaks to the paradox of staying private while presenting publicly, extending the concept of exposure beyond the graphic work.

With an abstract representation of a crowded day at the shore as a backdrop, a variety of playful props will give patrons the ability to create and post selfies that insure anonymity.

In this age of social media, we grapple with versions of ourselves that we put out into the world. Fear of missing out tugs at our egos as we tell the world stories that exaggerate and glamorize us above the mundane. We present ourselves in a highly curated manner.

It may be the time has come for pushback against these fabrications, forwarding a desire to show ourselves more realistically. However, doing so leaves us in a vulnerable place, open to trolls eager to subvert even the most benign postings. Yet we are drawn to the brief burst of fame that comes with a flurry of likes and thumbs-up reactions. Our whole self-worth can be propelled or defeated by feedback to a single exposure, but we still strive for that recognition.

At Anonymous@theBeach, patrons will have the unique opportunity to satisfy both the desire for recognition and anonymity at the same time, existing simultaneously as the observed and the observer.

Nurit Avesar: In Your World
Solo Exhibition

June 1 – June 30, 2019

Opening Reception:
Saturday, June 1st, 2019 3-6 pm

Mike Kelly Gallery, Beyond Baroque
681 Venice Blvd., Venice, California 90291

 

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/439544003518543/

Nurit Avesar’s dynamic new work is a powerful statement about the delicate fragility of the environment and the way of life as we know it.
Avesar’s process involves sanding and juxtaposing multiple layers. Shana Nys Dambrot explains “her surfaces have the curious visual quality of grave-rubbings, in which content emerges in layers, as long-hidden ideas are excavated before one’s eyes. By embedding wire mesh into the thick pigment, she gives the paintings further dimensionality as objects.”

Born and raised in Israel, Avesar moved to LA in her early twenties. She earned a MASTER OF ART in Studio Art from California State University Northridge. Her recent exhibitions include the Carnegie Museum in Oxnard, a two-woman show at Shoebox Projects, a solo show at the Neutra Institute Museum and Gallery in Silverlake and the Brand Library and Art Gallery in Glendale.

Open Studio @ FlechtroNEONics
Sunday May 19, 1-5pm

Featuring the work of Linda Sue Price and Michael Flechtner

7712 Gloria Avenue, #4,
Van Nuys, CA

RSVP to Flektro@aol.com

LINDA SUE PRICE

“I like to mix form, light, reflection and texture. I do this by layering and adding other elements such as clear acrylic rods and reflective backgrounds. While the viewer cannot know the simple and sometimes complex stories behind each piece, they can reconsider their perceptions of neon and the world around them. When I look at a neon tube, I don’t see a sign even if it is. I see a luminous glow. I want to share the beauty and playfulness of neon.” Linda Sue Price

I have been looking at and admiring neon since I was a child living and traveling through the western states. The intense colors and glow of the motel and business signs appealed to me and I thought they were beautiful. A visit to Las Vegas was always special because of extensive use of neon all over the buildings. There was a palm tree in front of one of casinos that I loved. In Southern California, there were special signs that I looked forward to seeing. Long Beach had a drive-in theatre near the traffic circle that had wonderful neon. Motel signs often had animation. I liked to look at them and try to figure out the animation patterns.

I started working with neon as an art media in 2004. I took a neon class through the Museum of Neon Art taught by Michael Flechtner. I wanted to explore a free form style and he encouraged me to try bending. I began studying the craft of bending with Flechtner in 2005.

Linda Sue Price lives and works in Los Angeles County, California. Price is known for injecting her personal reflections to stimulate emotion and to manipulate how neon is perceived as a medium. She began studying neon as a medium under Michael Flechtner at the Museum of Neon Art beginning in 2004, where she developed her particular technique of bending. Elements of historic neon signs, abstract expressionism, pop art and graphic design influence Linda Sue Price’s work.

Exhibitions include solo shows at TAG Gallery in Los Angeles, California; two-person exhibits at the Fine Arts Building in Los Angeles and several group shows in the Western United States. She serves as an advisory board member for the Museum of Neon Art in Glendale, California.

MICHAEL FLECHTNER

Neon, more properly luminous tube, has been my medium of expression for nearly a decade. It has replaced the paint and sculptural materials I used as a student. I’m ever mindful of the compelling nature of this pure, colored, glowing light and the tendency of many to see “all things neon” as signage or kitsch. It is my experience that the more traditional viewer and critic resist seeing neon as a fine art medium.

My work reflects a fascination with the symbols of language, technology and how they influence popular culture. I describe animals, machinery, etc. and utilize various forms of language. The various “components” inhabit my internal landscape. I bring forth and arrange this highly idiosyncratic material to create pictograms, ideograms and rebuses, surely the effects of my unconscious. Through the creation of these pieces I work through and process personal issues and attitudes. Each piece is a complete record of that process. In spite of this focus on my “inner self”, this work is for everyone. To that end the figures are recognizable and the compositions are “pleasing to the eye.” And if the viewer wants more, they can apply there own meanings and interpretations which I feel are as relevant as my own.

Because many of the pieces are so enigmatic, I post an interpretation. Often the viewer has overlain their own meanings. Because of certain psychological theories, I believe their ideas and interpretations are as pertinent and valid in this exchange as mine.

I do not enjoin others toward a path to perfection, instead I endeavor to live my life consciously in the hope it will become a passive example to others trying to find their particular path. Hopefully the form of my work, not content, will suggest a framework for others. My goal is to continue along this path, passing on method and information. I believe that my work offers the viewer a new way of codifying the world and locating themselves within it. Through the exchange between artist and viewer, we become a little more comfortable to question, enjoy and suspend, even if only for a moment, the struggle we all face in everyday life.

 

Blue Roof Studios Announces The Second Annual Blue Roof Studios Arts Festival

Saturday June 22, 2019 from 12 noon to 5 pm

Blue Roof Studios
7329 S Broadway
Los Angeles, CA 90003
https://www.blueroofstudios.org/

Blue Roof Studios is pleased to announce the second annual Blue Roof Studios Arts Festival, Saturday, June 22, 2019 from 12 noon-5pm. The Festival celebrates the summer solstice while highlighting the richness and diversity of the arts in South Los Angeles and beyond. It reflects Blue Roof Studio’s commitment to fostering and amplifying creativity, connection, and inclusion within the community.

Free and open to the public, the day will offer contemporary street performance, mural painting, traditional African master drummers, outdoor and indoor art installations, resident artists’ open studios, a video screening, art-making workshops and culinary arts.

Blue Roof Studios and festival founder Galia Linn describes the vision of the festival, “Engaging in exploration of the seemingly impossible, as art does, amplifies the creative forces of a community.”

Last June, the Festival featured over 100 artists: visual artists, musicians, dancers and performers. It drew 450 attendees from the surrounding community and beyond, who came to view the exhibitions, participate in workshops, sample the array of food offered, shop in the art bazaar and experience the performances.

Art installations will include EPHEMERA, a group show curated by Mario Ezquita under the direction of Jill Moniz in the Blue Roof Studios sanctuary and selected outdoor public spaces. Let me eat cake, a multi-media group show of Los Angeles based artists curated by Kristine Schomaker will be presented in the project room. In addition, Blue Roof Studios resident artists Galia Linn, Diana Magui, Adele Kandarian, Terri Klass, Jacqueline Palafox, Cole James, and Sarah Gail Armstrong will open their studios for the event.

Art making workshops will include; a clay workshop by artist Beverly Morrison, a recycled materials art workshop organized by Barnsdall Arts, Books that Breathe by Cole James, chalk drawing by Amanda Maciel Antunes and participatory mural painting on the outside of the building with Arts Bridging the Gap.

Live music and performances will be provided throughout the day by returning musicians Joaquin Romero /DJ Wordamouph and Aboubacar Kouyate leading a participatory drum circle. Allison M Keating of Wild Art Group will present a tiny toy theater performance Finally, a Play about Joy.

Artist Carolina Caycedo will screen Rituals of Labor and Engagement, a video produced for her recent show at the Huntington Library.

The Festival is funded in part by the Department of Cultural Affairs Art Activation Fund. Blue Roof Studios is partnering with Shoebox PR (https://shoeboxpr.com/) and Bardo LA (https://www.bardola.org) on this year’s iteration.

Founded in 2016 by artist Galia Linn, Blue Roof Studios is a new multidisciplinary art hub
located in South Los Angeles. It offers a place for artists to work in an environment that
fosters creativity, community and hosts events that promote dialogue with artists and the public.

More artists to be announced shortly. For more information, please visit http://www.blueroofstudios.org or email: Allison M. Keating blueroofstudios6@gmail.com.

Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BRSarts/ and
Instagram: @blueroofstudios

 

Inherited Memories
a three-women art exhibition

Shula Singer Arbel
Dwora Fried
Malka Nedivi

Curated by Peter Frank

Castelli Art Space
5428 Washington Blvd,
Los Angeles, CA 90016
https://www.castelliartspace.com/

Opening Reception: Saturday, May 18 from 6:00-9:00pm
Artists’ Talk (moderated by Peter Frank) Sunday, May 26 from 3:00-5:00pm

The recent rise of white nationalism, anti-Semitism and hate crimes prompted three Los Angeles artists, whose mothers were Holocaust survivors, to come together in a group show. In Inherited Memories, opening May 18 at Castelli Art Space, Shula Singer Arbel, Dwora Fried and Malka Nedivi confront the viewers with the power of memory and remind us of the generational effects of trauma.

“More to the point,” says Peter Frank, “the mothers of these three women went through the ordeal, profoundly impacting their daughters and the art they make. The work of Shula Singer Arbel, Dwora Fried, and Malka Nedivi, however, manifests more than a simple acknowledgment of the tribulations their mothers underwent before giving birth to them: it embodies sensations experienced one way by the elder women themselves and another by their offspring. It is in this experiential slippage that the art finds its eloquence; and it is in the three artists’ diverse stylistic and discursive approaches that the exhibition finds its resonance.

The work of each artist tacitly denotes a different temporal relationship to the devastating event. Fried’s assemblages reflect on the normal life led by her mother’s family in prewar Krakow and the “post-normal” life her own family led in postwar Vienna– what was lost. Arbel’s paintings are based on photographs from the Bavarian Displaced Persons Camp where her parents met after the war – what was gained back. And Nedivi’s sculpted figures and objects muse upon the dysphoria her mother experienced in a painful present – what could be survived but not tolerated.”

About Shula Singer Arbel
Shula Singer Arbel was born in Israel and moved to Los Angeles at the age of three. She received an MFA degree from UCLA in Film Production and worked for many years in the film industry as an editor, writer, and researcher. Arbel was the first recipient of the Barbra Streisand Screenwriting Award. She wrote and directed short films, showing in the independent film circuit in the United States and Europe. After leaving film, she returned to her original love: painting. She is now a full-time artist and a member of the Los Angeles Art Association, Women Painters West, and the Jewish Artists Initiative. Shula received the Best of Show Award in the 2010 Gold Medal Exhibition at Valley Institute of Visual Arts (VIVA).
http://shulasingerarbel.com/

About Dwora Fried
Dwora Fried is an assemblage artist creating mixed media sculptural spaces in wooden boxes. Her small rooms evoke what it was like to grow up as an outsider in postwar Vienna: being Jewish, lesbian and a child of Holocaust survivors, she learned to see everything through the prism of loss, danger and secrecy. Dwora studied art at Avni School of Fine Arts in Tel Aviv, Israel. She has had solo shows in London, England, Venice, Italy at the Jewish Museum, Vienna, Austria (her art is in the permanent collection of Austria’s MUSA Museum ) and Los Angeles, California. She has exhibited in Chicago’s Elmhurst Art Museum, Grafiska Sällskapet in Stockholm, Sweden, San Francisco’s Arc Gallery and Orange County Center for the arts. Her work was shown at Launch LA/Korean Cultural Center, Irvine Fine Arts and the newly opened MASH gallery in Downtown LA. Her life size interactive installations were part of her solo show at the Los Angeles Art Association and a political group show at Fullerton College Art.
https://dworafried.com/

About Malka Nedivi
Malka Nedivi is an artist living and working in Los Angeles. She was born in Rehovot, Israel in 1952, an only child to parents who survived the Holocaust and emigrated from Poland. Studying Theater and literature at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, she directed plays and taught theater. Recently Malka had a successful solo show at the National Council of Jewish Women, had a solo exhibition at BOA Art Gallery in Los Angeles, and was featured in the LA Art Show at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Malka was also chosen as one of the top ten Southern California Contemporary Artists from Israel at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery. Malka has had write-ups in the Beverly Press, Jewish Journal, Diversions LA, Filling the Negative Space, Tribe Journal, Trebuchet Magazine and she is the subject of a feature in the Huffington Post.
http://malkanedivi.com/